NEUROFIBRILLARY DEGENERATION

OUR RESEARCH FOCUSES ON THE DRIVERS AND MECHANISMS OF NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLE FORMATION AND TOXICITY IN NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS.  WE ARE USING STATE-OF-THE-ART BIOCHEMICAL, MOLECULAR, AND GENETIC APPROACHES TO UNLOCK THE SECRETS OF DEVASTATING BRAIN DISEASES ​ 

Research overview

Our research focuses on the molecular neuropathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we are trying to unravel the molecular changes occurring in diseases with neurofibrillary tangles composed of the tau protein (i.e., tauopathies).  This diverse set of brain diseases includes dementias, such as Alzheimer's disease, and movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and related conditions. We are using histological, genetic, biochemical and molecular approaches to pinpoint underlying molecular and cellular triggers of these diseases. One major outstanding question surrounding neurodegenerative diseases involves the nature of the regional susceptibility of neuroanatomically distinct neuronal populations to degenerate. We are particularly interested in changes occurring in limbic (e.g., the hippocampus and amygdala) and mesolimbic structures, and how degenerative changes intersect with normal mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, development, survival, and cell death. Major ongoing projects in the laboratory include:

  • Clinical and genetic studies of primary age-related tauopathy
  • Regulation of tau expression in Alzheimer's disease and aging
  • Genetic investigation of chronic traumatic encephalopathy

"IT IS FAIR TO SAY THAT, IN GENERAL, NO PROBLEMS HAVE BEEN EXHAUSTED; INSTEAD, MEN HAVE BEEN EXHAUSTED BY THE PROBLEMS."

                                                                                            -- SANTIAGO RAMON Y CAJAL

John Crary, MD-PhD

Principal Investigator


Dr. Crary obtained his MD and PhD from the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center and conducted is neuropathology training at Columbia University Medical Center ...